endurance Tag

The Concurrent Training Effect Blog #4 The first three blogs of this series provided a basic understanding of the molecular underpinnings of the concurrent training effect (the blunting/elimination of the hypertrophy and strength response when both strength and endurance training are performed concurrently).  This edition is going to take that knowledge and use it to recommend specific training protocols focused on mitigating, and potentially even eliminating it. The primary training factor which seems to drive the concurrent training effect is the intensity of the endurance exercise being performed.  Closely following intensity is frequency, and when high intensity is combined with high frequency...

This 2nd edition of The Concurrent Training Effect blog is going to focus on the molecular underpinnings of skeletal muscular hypertrophy.  Understanding the driving force behind the molecular response to strength training can provide us insight into why concurrent strength and endurance training can negatively affect muscular hypertrophy and strength.  In addition, a better understanding can lead to ways to mitigate the effect and optimize progress.  If you are a CrossFitter, or any other form of hybrid athlete this blog is for you.  Keep reading… [caption id="attachment_11060" align="alignnone" width="600"] Mike Mentzer - knew a thing or two about muscular hypertrophy.[/caption] A Very...

Sequence Your Training for Optimal Results by Chris Mason With the recent massive increase in the popularity of training multiple fitness components simultaneously (CrossFit being the driving force of this movement) the topic of exercise sequencing for optimal results has become particularly poignant. Physical fitness and performance are comprised of many different specific attributes. For example, strength has many forms all of which contribute to the body's ability to move through space. Strength can be viewed as a spectrum ranging from starting strength (the ability to produce maximal force in the first 30 milliseconds of movement), to explosive strength...

Sequence Your Training for Optimal Results by Chris Mason With the recent massive increase in the popularity of training multiple fitness components simultaneously the topic of exercise sequencing for optimal results has become particularly poignant. Physical fitness and performance are comprised of many different specific attributes. For example, strength has many forms all of which contribute to the body's ability to move through space. Strength can be viewed as a spectrum ranging from starting strength (the ability to produce maximal force in the first 30 milliseconds of movement), to explosive strength (the ability to very quickly, albeit not quite as quickly as starting...

Question: Chris, how do you alter your training immediately following a competition? The competition that you have just completed and the time of year largely dictate the recovery process afterwards. By the way, and to digress from the question for a moment, if you are serious about being competitive in CrossFit it's a good idea to do some local or larger regional competitions. What that does is give you a chance to "test" your plan for tapering, warm-ups at the competition, meals between workouts, and so on. For the local/regional competitions your rest/recovery time can be as short as...